Consistency IS the Magic Pill: The Secret for Creating a Better Life

We are desperate for things to change in our lives. We want the quick fix. What if consistency is the magic pill we have been seeking all along?

Addicted to Instant Gratification

Our society is addicted to the lie that our problems, and more specifically, the symptoms of our problems can be fixed by taking a magic pill.

We desire quick fixes and instant solutions.

We believe they are possible.

We just haven’t found it yet.

But this isn’t the nature of our most important lessons in life.

The most important solutions are far from instant.

The Search for the Magic Pill

Many times my clients want to quit after one attempt when they don’t get an instant result.

I’m not offended, nor am I surprised.

We have to retrain their brain after a lifetime of conditioning about the lie that there’s a magic instant pill for their problem.

But here’s the limitless life truth: change and mastery are never created after one shot, one try.

Health improvements, weight loss, habit change, fixing broken relationship patterns…

These are all big problems that took years to create. It’s a lie to believe that there’s an instant solution to any of these problems.

Consistently Quitting Before You Fail

Quitting after one attempt that didn’t work, didn’t change your problem is the equivalent of a bunch of crawling adults.

You see, when we are babies and we are learning to walk do we try once and quit when we can’t do it?

HELL NO.

I know you don’t remember your own attempts to learn to walk, so if you’re a parent, good news, you got to watch your little go through this process.

Babies lack the strength to walk.

They keep trying, keep falling.

They don’t try once and then assume there’s something wrong with them, that they can never create the change (walking rather than crawling).

It’s through the process of falling over and again that babies become strong and coordinated enough to walk.

Consistent Fear of Failure

But here you are as an adult, trying something once, expecting miraculous, life-changing results and giving up when it doesn’t happen.

It’s the equivalent to trying to learn to walk, not being a professional the first time, then resorting to crawling for the rest of your life.

And I see crawling adults EVERYWHERE.

Around the age of 8 failure shifts from an experience to a personal characteristic.

We start to believe that when we try something and it does not work for us that we must be a failure rather than believing it was just a failed attempt.

Because we begin to fear failure because it proves our inadequacy and shortcomings (in this flawed thought model) we create self-imposed limits on our happiness and success.

We create consistency in quitting on ourselves. We choose to fail before we start.

But here’s another limitless life truth: You are never a failure unless you quit.

Unless you stop dreaming.

Unless you stop picking yourself up and start to believe that maybe you’re just supposed to crawl for the rest of your life.

Choosing Consistency Instead

How do you walk it back if this has been your practice?

Take small, consistent daily action with faith.

Focus on showing up for the process and know without a doubt that the result will come.

Great change is incremental not instant.

Even lottery winners consistently play.

Showing up for yourself, for a better life, a life without limits is absolutely winning the lottery.

You deserve to have that life.

You are worthy.

You are enough.

Just do the thing consistently that will get you the results you seek.

Consistency is the magic pill. Just keep showing up for yourself and the change you seek.

Choose to walk, not crawl my friends.

 

In what areas of your life have you chosen to crawl rather than learn to walk? Comment below! I’d love to know!

 

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